Introduction to ASCL Courses

Malaika Naidu
Asian School of Cyber Laws Blog Background
Introduction to ASCL courses

Asian School of Cyber Laws is an organisation that strives to make education easily accessible and efficiently delivered. Our journey began in 1999, even before the Information Technology Act (2000) came into effect. Bringing together the fields of Information Technology and Law, our courses are carefully crafted to serve members of the legal fraternity as well as individuals from other fields such as business, banking, law enforcement, CA, CS, engineering, marketing and more. Over the last 20 years, we’ve shared our knowledge with over 75,000 students.

In a world where almost all our interactions are digital, and online safety is non-negotiable, people still tend to share ATM pins with others, write down passwords, and leave themselves logged in on computers that are not theirs. Some even continue to use QWERTY as a password!

ASCL has been ceaselessly working towards remedying this and strives to make cyber education as simple to comprehend as 2+2=4.

All our courses are for a duration of 6-months with digital course material and online examinations. Here’s a brief overview:

Diploma in Cyber Law (DCL)
An introduction to the field of cyber law, DCL covers the basics that everyone must know about the laws that govern cyber space. The course will help you navigate real situations like leaked photos, credit card fraud, hacked emails or social media accounts, and other such real cyber issues. The syllabus covers the fundamentals of cyber law with actual case examples.

Cyber Crime Prosecution and Defence (CCPD)
CCPD will help you navigate the judicial and investigative framework under the Information Technology Act, 2000. This tailor-made course for lawyers and law enforcement officers, covers relevant entities, terms and concepts with cyber-crime case laws and global cyber-crime law all from the perspective of presenting cases in prosecution or defence. An expert level course that requires participants to have at least completed their graduation, it’s also available to law students who have completed 3 years of the integrated 5-year LLb program.

Digital Evidence Specialist (DES)
Digital evidence is becoming increasingly relevant in conventional and unconventional crimes such as murder, adultery, data theft, matrimony scams, cyber stalking, online banking fraud and many more. This is only natural given we use the internet for everything from communication to buying groceries! This course covers the various types of digital evidence and standard operating procedures using case files. It emphasises on the collection and the subsequent production of such evidence in a court of law. Participants need to complete their under-grad to apply for DES. It’s also available to law students who have completed 3 years of the integrated 5 year LLb program.

Internet Investigation Specialist (IIS)
With the rapid growth in cyber-crimes, internet investigators are a growing breed. This course starts from the basics of the internet and the World Wide Web, followed by tools, tips and tricks to conduct digital investigation. From emails to screenshots, browser history to social media activity, including cloud safety and bitcoins – IIS will help you achieve Sherlock’s level of attention to detail and crime solving ability!

There you have it. To start your journey in the cyber world with ASCL, click here! The best part is – we’re constantly looking at feedback to develop fresh courses that could fill gaps in the current system. Soon, we will be offering state of the art courses in Intellectual Property Law too. Stay tuned for more updates!

The 9 sides of cyber security

Endpoint security — Network Security — Application Security — Incident Response — Regulatory Compliance — Data Protection — Training — Testing — Contingency Planning

9 Sides of Cyber Security

1. End-point security

Endpoint security requires that each computing device on the network comply with certain standards before network access is granted.

Endpoints include laptops, desktops computers, smart phones, and other communication devices, tablets, specialized equipment such as bar code readers, point of sale (POS) terminals etc.

End-point security encompasses:

  1. Host-based firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and intrusion prevention systems
  2. Host-based anti-virus systems, anti-malware systems, anti-spyware systems, anti-rootkit systems, anti-phishing systems, pop-up blockers, spam detection systems, unified threat management systems
  3. SSL Virtual Private Networks
  4. Host Patch and Vulnerability Management
  5. Memory protection programs
  6. Control over memory devices, Bluetooth Security
  7. Password Management
  8. Security for Full Virtualization Technologies
  9. Media Sanitization
  10. Securing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Systems

2. Network Security

Network security relates to the cyber security aspects of computer networks and network-accessible resources.

Network Security encompasses:

  1. Secure authentication and identification of network users, hosts, applications, services and resources
  2. Network-based firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and intrusion prevention systems
  3. Network-based anti-virus systems, anti-malware systems, anti-spyware systems, anti-rootkit systems, unified threat management systems
  4. Network Patch and Vulnerability Management
  5. Virtual Private Networks
  6. Securing Wireless Networks
  7. Computer Security Log Management
  8. Enterprise Telework and Remote Access Security
  9. Securing WiMAX Wireless Communications
  10. Network Monitoring
  11. Network Policy Management

3. Application Security

Application security relates to the cyber security aspects of applications and the underlying systems.

Application attacks include:

  1. Input Validation attacks such as buffer overflow, cross-site scripting, SQL injection, canonicalization
  2. Authentication attacks such as network eavesdropping, brute force attacks, dictionary attacks, cookie replay, credential theft
  3. Authorization attacks such as elevation of privilege, the disclosure of confidential data, data tampering, luring attacks
  4. Configuration management attacks such as unauthorized access to administration interfaces / configuration stores, retrieval of clear text configuration data, lack of individual accountability, over-privileged process & service accounts
  5. Sensitive information attacks such as access to sensitive data in storage, network eavesdropping,
  6. Session management attacks such as session hijacking, session replay, man in the middle,
  7. Cryptography attacks due to poor key generation or key management and weak or custom encryption,
  8. Parameter manipulation attacks e.g. query string manipulation, form field / cookie / HTTP header manipulation,
  9. Exception management attacks such as denial of service,
  10. Auditing and logging attacks

4. Cyber Incident Response

Incident Response relates to the plans, policies, and procedures for handling cyber security incidents.

Broadly speaking, Cyber Incident Response covers:

  1. Organizing an Incident Response Capability
  2. Preparing for and preventing Incidents
  3. Detection and analysis of Incidents
  4. Containment, Eradication, and Recovery
  5. Post Incident Activity

Specifically, Cyber Incident Response encompasses:

  1. Forensic Imaging & Cloning
  2. Recovering Digital Evidence in Computer Devices
  3. Mathematical Authentication of Digital Evidence
  4. Analysing Data from Data Files, Operating Systems, Network Traffic, Applications, and Multiple Sources
  5. Analyzing Active Data, Latent Data, and Archival Data
  6. Wireless, Network, Database and Password forensics
  7. Social media forensics
  8. Malware, Memory and Browser forensics
  9. Cell Phone Forensics
  10. Web and Email investigation
  11. Analysing Server Logs

5. Regulatory Compliance

Regulatory Compliance relates to measures undertaken to ensure compliance with applicable laws and mandatory cyber security standards.

Failure to meet regulatory compliance requirements can result in civil and criminal action and even imprisonment for organization heads.

Usage of consolidated and harmonized compliance controls ensures regulatory compliance without unnecessary duplication of effort and activity.

One such control system is the “Effective Compliance and Ethics Program” contained in Chapter 8B2.1 of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines Manual issued by the United States Sentencing Commission.

Another control is the “AS 3806- 2006” issued by Standards Australia. This provides guidance on:

  1. The principles of effective management of an organization’s compliance with its legal obligations, as well as any other relevant obligations such as industry and organizational standards
  2. The principles of good governance and accepted community and ethical norms.

6. Data Protection

Data Protection relates to the cyber security aspects of protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data.

From a Data Protection perspective, data can be classified into 3 types — data at rest, data in motion and data under use.

Critical and confidential data includes source code, product design documents, process documentation, internal price lists, financial documents, strategic planning documents, due diligence research for mergers and acquisitions, employee information, customer data such as credit card numbers, medical records, financial statements etc.

Data Loss Prevention solutions:

  1. Identify confidential data
  2. Track that data as it moves through and out of enterprise
  3. Prevent unauthorized disclosure of data by creating and enforcing disclosure policies

Various encryption technologies such as symmetric encryption, public key encryption, and full disk encryption can be used for data protection.

A data protection policy involves:

  1. Instituting good security and privacy policies for collecting, using and storing sensitive information
  2. Using strong encryption for data storage.
  3. Limiting access to sensitive data.
  4. Safely purging old or outdated sensitive information.

7. Cyber Security Training

Cyber Security Training is a formal process for educating personnel about cyber security and building relevant skills and competencies.

Cyber Security Training ensures that relevant personnel understand their cyber security responsibilities. This enables them to properly use and protect the information and resources entrusted to them.

Effective cyber security training must include:

  1. Real-world training on systems that emulate the live environment,
  2. Continual training capability for routine training,
  3. Timely exposure to new threat scenarios,
  4. Exposure to updated scenarios reflecting the current threat environment,
  5. Coverage of basic day-to-day practices required by the users

8. Cyber Security Testing

Cyber Security Testing is the process of ascertaining how effectively the entity meets specific cyber security objectives.

Cyber Security Testing encompasses:

  1. Review Techniques, which include Documentation Review, Log Review, Ruleset Review, System Configuration Review, Network Sniffing, and File Integrity Checking
  2. Target Identification and Analysis Techniques, which include Network Discovery, Network Port and Service Identification, Vulnerability Scanning, Active & Passive Wireless Scanning, Wireless Device Location Tracking, and Bluetooth Scanning
  3. Target Vulnerability Validation Techniques which include Password Cracking, Penetration Testing, Penetration Testing and Social Engineering
  4. Security Assessment Planning which includes Developing a Security Assessment Policy, Prioritizing and Scheduling Assessments, Selecting and Customizing Techniques, Assessment Logistics, Assessor Selection and Skills, Location Selection, Technical Tools and Resources Selection, Assessment Plan Development and Legal Considerations
  5. Security Assessment Execution which includes Coordination, Assessing, Analysis, Data Handling, Data Collection, Data Storage, Data Transmission and Data Destruction
  6. Post Testing Activities which includes Mitigation Recommendations, Reporting and Remediation/Mitigation

9. Contingency Planning

Contingency planning revolves around preparing for unexpected and potentially unfavorable events that are likely to have an adverse impact.

Types of Contingency Plans are:

  1. Business Continuity Plan
  2. Continuity of Operations Plan
  3. Crisis Communications Plan
  4. Critical Infrastructure Protection Plan
  5. Cyber Incident Response Plan
  6. Disaster Recovery Plan
  7. Information System Contingency Plan
  8. Occupant Emergency Plan

Stages in the Information System Contingency Planning Process are:

  1. Developing the Contingency Planning Policy Statement
  2. Conducting the Business Impact Analysis
  3. Identifying Preventive Controls
  4. Creating Contingency Strategies
  5. Plan Testing, Training, and Exercises
  6. Plan Maintenance

22 Essential Skills for a Cyber Crime Investigator

22 Skills of a Cyber Crime Investigator

We live in a world where everything seems to be getting hacked — Airplanes, ATM machines, Baby monitors, Biometric devices, Bitcoin wallets, Cars, CCTV cameras, Drones, Gaming consoles, Health trackers, Medical devices, Power plants, Self-aiming rifles, Ships, Smart-watches, Smartphones & more.

The increasing global cost of cybercrime ($100 billion+ a year) has led to a massive surge in the demand for cybercrime investigators. This article explores the 22 skills every cybercrime investigator must have.

Skill 1: Web Technologies

Considering the magnitude and impact of web attacks, it is necessary for a cyber crime investigator to understand some of the technologies that run the Internet and the World Wide Web.

This includes practical activities including hosting a domain, creating SFTP users, setting up custom MX records, setting up, configuring & administering private email accounts, databases, and Virtual Private Servers, configuring SSL for secure websites and deploying cloud infrastructure. The investigator must also understand installing, configuring & deploying content management systems and e-commerce platforms.

Skill 2: Web Hacking

Since a majority of cyber crime cases involve web-hacking or web-attacks, it is essential for cyber crime investigators to have a strong knowledge of the techniques of web hacking such as Footprinting, Bypassing Authorization Schema, SQL injection, Cross Site Scripting (XSS), Broken Authentication, Session Hijacking, Unvalidated Redirects & Forwards, and Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF).

Skill 3: Suspect interviewing

Effective suspect interviewing is an essential skill for cybercrime investigators. The investigator must understand the difference between an interrogation and an interview and how to prepare for and conduct a suspect interview. The investigator must be able to detect deception, document an interview and get an admission from a suspect. An investigator must also know how to conduct an inquiry in an organization.

Skill 4: Documentation

Even the best investigation is worthless if it is not supported by accurate and relevant documentation and that’s why a thorough understanding of documentation is essential for a cybercrime investigator.

Skill 5: Law

Every step of an investigation must be in compliance with the law and that’s why a thorough understanding of the applicable law is essential for a cyber crime investigator.

Skill 6: Phishing tools, techniques, and counter-measures

Phishing is one of the most popular techniques among hackers and financial cyber criminals. This makes it important for a cyber crime investigator to understand phishing tools, techniques, and counter-measures.

Skill 7: Virtual Payment Systems

Virtual Payment Systems have taken the global money markets by storm. A cyber crime investigator must have a strong understanding of how these systems work.

Skill 8: Financial instruments and concepts

Financial crimes are some of the most interesting cases that cyber crime investigators are called upon to solve. These include including advance-fee scam, bank frauds & carding, charge back fraud, check washing, check fraud, credit card fraud, identity theft, insider trading, insurance fraud, mortgage fraud, ponzi schemes, securities fraud, skimming, wireless identity theft and more.

Skill 9: Forensic accounting

Forensic Accountants are called upon in cases involving economic damages calculations, bankruptcy, securities fraud, tax fraud, money laundering, business valuation, and e-discovery. It is important for a cyber crime investigator to have a basic understanding of forensic accounting.

Skill 10: Fraud Investigation

Many times a cyber crime investigator is called upon to handle fraud investigations. An investigator must understand Fraud (its extent, patterns and causes), Fraud Risk Assessment & Management, Fraud Prevention, Detection & Reporting.

Skill 11: Bitcoin & other crypto-currencies

Bitcoin is, without doubt, the most famous crypto-currency. It gained a lot of notoriety during the crackdown on Silk Road, an underground online marketplace trading in drugs, stolen financial information, weapons & more.

Considering the use of bitcoin (and other cryptocurrencies) by criminals, a strong understanding of bitcoin forensics is essential for cyber crime investigators.

Skill 12: Malware incident prevention & incident response

Considering the impact of malware, it is essential for a cyber crime investigator to have a strong understanding of malware incident prevention and malware incident response.

Skill 13: Dark Web

The World Wide Web that the vast majority of netizens use is also referred to as the clearnet — since it primarily is unencrypted in nature. Then there is the deep web — the part of the clearnet, which is not indexed by search engines. Deep web includes data stored in password-protected pages and databases. The darkweb is a small part of the deepweb. The deepweb consists of darknets including peer-to-peer networks, Freenet, I2P, and Tor. The Tor darkweb is also called onionland, since its top level domain suffix is .onion and it uses the traffic anonymization technique of onion routing.

Considering the popularity of the darkweb amongst the organized criminals groups, a cyber crime investigator must have a thorough working knowledge of the dark web.

Skill 14: Email investigation

Despite the popularity of instant messengers (such as Whatsapp) and social media, email remains one of the most popular methods of online communication in the world. This makes it essential for a cyber crime investigator to have a strong knowledge of email tracking & tracing.

Skill 15: Log analysis

In a large number of cyber crime cases, the investigation begins with an analysis of server logs. It is essential for a cyber crime investigator to have a sound working knowledge of server log analysis.

Skill 16: Browser forensics

In many cases of cyber crime, valuable evidence can be obtained from web browsers. This makes it important for a cyber crime investigator to have a strong practical knowledge of browser forensics.

These evidence points include history, bookmarks, credit card information & contact information stored in autofill, saved passwords, files in the download location. Browser forensics also involves analysis of cloud printers and other connected devices, extensions, cookies and site data, location settings and exceptions, media settings (like camera and microphone permissions) & exceptions, unsandboxed plug-in access & exceptions, automatic downloads and exceptions and more.

Skill 17: Social Media Forensics

It’s probably not incorrect to say that almost every Internet user is part of at least one social media platform. This makes social media forensics an essential skill for a cyber crime investigator.

Skill 18: Google Ecosystem & its Forensics

Google isn’t just a search engine anymore. The Google ecosystem is all around us — Gmail, YouTube, Google groups, Google sites, Google plus, Google keep and so much more. This makes Google forensics a must-have skill for cyber crime investigators.

Skill 19: Forensic technologies

It is essential for a cyber crime investigator to have a strong working knowledge of forensic technologies, cyber forensic concepts and ISO/IEC 27037 — the most important global standard for identification, collection, acquisition and preservation of potential digital evidence.

Skill 20: Cyber security

A basic working knowledge of cyber security is essential for everyone and more so for cyber crime investigators. Aspects of information security include Application Security, Cloud Computing Security, Computer Security, Cyber Security Standards, Data Security, Database Security, Information Security, Internet Security, Mobile Security, and Network Security.

Skill 21: Cryptography & Steganography

Many people use cryptography and steganography. And these include criminals and terrorists. Hence a working knowledge of these is useful for cyber crime investigators.

Skill 22: Password recovery & forensics

In many cases it is found that potential evidence is locked up in password protected files. This makes it essential for cyber crime investigators to have a strong practical knowledge of password recovery & forensics.

Cyber Education- the Road Less Known

Cyber Education - the road less known

I’m not a techie, nor a lawyer and yet here I am in a field that takes on both these mammoths. I’ve been here a long time; India’s had her cyber law in place since the year 2000. So, it’s deeply disappointing to see the confusion in students and professionals alike about the various aspects of a cyber education.

Yes, I said cyber education and not just an IT education. So, I’m not only talking about the technology in cyberspace. I’m referring to the other side of the spectrum.

9 out of 10 people today have faced some type of cybercrime. And yet, almost 7 out of those 9 will not know what to do about it.

I thought about cybercrime, you know, as a non-techie and a non-lawyer, and decided to break it down to its foundation stones.

Here, let’s create our first bifurcation. Cybercrime may be divided into 2 parts — Pre-crime and Post-crime

Pre-crime

This is where your crime hasn’t happened yet. So, you are basically hoping for the best and preparing for the worst. This can also be divided further into:

1. Cyber security

In layman’s terms, every step that you take to ensure that your computer hardware, computer software, networks, accounts etc. remain safe from any breach, aka cybercrime, is cyber security. Simple, isn’t it? Well, simple is where this article stays. You want a connoisseur’s break up of the cyber security menu, see: The 9 sides of cyber security

2. Cyber Insurance

The obvious next step in pre-crime schedule. What you may not be able to secure ought to be insured.

Post-crime

This is where your cybercrime worst has happened. Now, hopefully, you aren’t affected too badly. But even if you are, there are divisions to this part that can help you.

1. Cyber Law

This is the law that governs cyberspace and as often as not has jurisdiction beyond your country. So, where do you report a cybercrime. Cyber law tells you the where, how and whom to approach. It also tells you the punishments for various cybercrimes. You know, in case you may be committing one?

2. Cyber Investigation

Here’s where the sleuths step in. Professionals here need to have that investigative streak and need to be armed with the latest tools and techniques of cyber investigation. This is where you get answers to how the cybercrime was committed and with any luck, may just get the criminal. And again, if you want the real dirt on what all an investigator needs to know, see — 25 Skills Essential for a Cyber Crime Investigator

So, you’re a student or professional who has a thought that they want a piece of the humongous cybercrime pie. This article may just have helped you understand where you want to be.

Just be prepared to keep learning to stay abreast in this ever-evolving super-exciting space.

What is cyber law and why do we need it?

What is cyber law and why do we need it?

What is Cyber Law?

In order to arrive at an acceptable definition of the term Cyber Law, we must first understand the meaning of the term law. Simply put, law encompasses the rules of conduct:

  1. that have been approved by the government, and
  2. which are in force over a certain territory, and
  3. which must be obeyed by all persons on that territory. Violation of these rules will lead to government action such as imprisonment or fine or an order to pay compensation.

The term cyber or cyberspace has today come to signify everything related to computers, the Internet, websites, data, emails, networks, software, data storage devices (such as hard disks, USB disks etc) and even Airplanes, ATM machines, Baby monitors, Biometric devices, Bitcoin wallets, Cars, CCTV cameras, Drones, Gaming consoles, Health trackers, Medical devices, Power plants, Self-aiming rifles, Ships, Smart-watches, Smartphones & more.

Thus a simplified definition of cyber law is that it is the “law governing cyber space”.

The issues addressed by cyber law include cyber crime, electronic commerce

1. Cyber crime

An interesting definition of cyber crime was provided in the “Computer Crime: Criminal Justice Resource Manual” published in 1989. According to this manual, cyber crime covered the following:

  1. computer crime i.e. any violation of specific laws that relate to computer crime,
  2. computer related crime i.e. violations of criminal law that involve a knowledge of computer technology for their perpetration, investigation, or prosecution,
  3. computer abuse i.e. intentional acts that may or may not be specifically prohibited by criminal statutes. Any intentional act involving knowledge of computer use or technology is computer abuse if one or more perpetrators made or could have made gain and / or one or more victims suffered or could have suffered loss.

2. Electronic commerce

The term electronic commerce or E-commerce is used to refer to electronic data used in commercial transactions. Electronic commerce laws usually address issues of data authentication by electronic and/or digital signatures.

3. Intellectual Property in as much as it applies to cyberspace

This encompasses:

  1. copyright law in relation to computer software, computer source code, websites, cell phone content etc;
  2. software and source code licenses;
  3. trademark law with relation to domain names, meta tags, mirroring, framing, linking etc.;
  4. semiconductor law which relates to the protection of semiconductor integrated circuits design and layouts;
  5. patent law in relation to computer hardware and software.

4. Data protection & privacy

Data protection and privacy laws address legal issues arising in the collecting, storing and transmitting sensitive personal data by data controllers such as banks, hospitals, email service providers etc.

The Need for Cyber Law

The first question that a student of cyber law will ask is whether there is a need for a separate field of law to cover cyberspace. Isn’t conventional law adequate to cover cyberspace?

Let us consider cases where so-called conventional crimes are carried out using computers or the Internet as a tool. Consider cases of spread of pornographic material, criminal threats delivered via email, websites that defame someone or spread racial hatred etc. In all these cases, the computer is merely incidental to the crime. Distributing pamphlets promoting racial enmity is in essence similar to putting up a website promoting such ill feelings.

Of course, it can be argued that when technology is used to commit such crimes, the effect and spread of the crime increases enormously. Printing and distributing pamphlets even in one locality is a time consuming and expensive task while putting up a globally accessible website is very easy.

In such cases, it can be argued that conventional law can handle cyber cases. The Government can simply impose a stricter liability (by way of imprisonment and fines) if the crime is committed using certain specified technologies. A simplified example would be stating that spreading pornography by electronic means should be punished more severely than spreading pornography by conventional means[1].

As long as we are dealing with such issues, conventional law would be adequate. The challenges emerge when we deal with more complex issues such as ‘theft’ of data. Under conventional law, theft relates to “movable property being taken out of the possession of someone”.

The General Clauses Act defines movable property as “property of every description, except immovable property”. The same law defines immovable property as “land, benefits to arise out of land, and things attached to the earth, or permanently fastened to anything attached to the earth”. Using these definitions, we can say that the computer is movable property.

Let us examine how such a law would apply to a scenario where data is ‘stolen’. Consider my personal computer on which I have stored some information. Let us presume that some unauthorized person picks up my computer and takes it away without my permission. Has he committed theft? The elements to consider are whether some movable property has been taken out of the possession of someone. The computer is movable property and I am the legal owner entitled to possess it. The thief has dishonestly taken this movable property out of my possession. It is theft.

Now consider that some unauthorized person simply copies the data from my computer onto his pen drive. Would this be theft? Presuming that the intangible data is movable property, the concept of theft would still not apply as the possession of the data has not been taken from me. I still have the ‘original’ data on the computer under my control. The ‘thief’ simply has a ‘copy’ of that data. In the digital world, the copy and the original are indistinguishable in almost every case.

Consider another illustration on the issue of ‘possession’ of data. I use the email account rohasnagpal@gmail.com for personal communication. Naturally, a lot of emails, images, documents etc are sent and received by me using this account. The first question is, who ‘possesses’ this email account? Is it me because I have the username and password needed to ‘login’ and view the emails? Or it is Google Inc because the emails are stored on their computers?

Another question would arise if some unauthorized person obtains my password. Can it be said that now that person is also in possession of my emails because he has the password to ‘login’ and view the emails?

Another legal challenge emerges because of the ‘mobility’ of data. Let us consider an example of international trade in the conventional world. Sameer purchases steel from a factory in China uses the steel to manufacture nails in a factory in India and then sells the nails to a trader in the USA. The various Governments can easily regulate and impose taxes at various stages of this business process.

Now consider that Sameer has shifted to an ‘online’ business. He sits in his house in Pune (India) and uses his computer to create pirated versions of expensive software. He then sells this pirated software through a website (hosted on a server located in Russia). People from all over the world can visit Sameer’s website and purchase the pirated software. Sameer collects the money using a PayPal account that is linked to his bank account in a tax haven country like the Cayman Islands.

It would be extremely difficult for any Government to trace Sameer’s activities.

It is for these and other complexities that conventional law is unfit to handle issues relating to cyberspace. This brings in the need for a separate branch of law to tackle cyberspace.

Master the art of Cyber Crime Investigation with the CCI+ course

Cyber Crime Investigators play a crucial role in eCommerce companies, audit firms, banks, IT companies, Government, police, enforcement & military agencies agencies and manufacturing companies.

We live in a world where everything seems to be getting hacked - not just laptops, smartphones & websites but also cars, aeroplanes, ships, drones, self aiming rifles, ships, CCTV cameras, medical devices, bitcoin wallets, smart-watches and more...

The ASCL Certified Cyber Crime Investigator + course prepares you to handle cases involving digital evidence and cyber trails.

Cyber Crime Investigators are an integral part of:

  • Information Security teams,
  • Incident Response teams,
  • Fraud Control teams.

These teams are crucial in eCommerce companies, audit firms, banks, IT companies, Government agencies and manufacturers.

Cyber Crime Investigators are also required by police, enforcement and military agencies.

Cyber Crime costs the world more than Rs. 57,000,000,000,000 every year. Companies and Governments need skilled cyber crime investigators to contain this US $ 114 billion annual cost.

The 25 skills every cyber crime investigator must have

  1. Basic Web Programming skills.
  2. Working knowledge of Web Technologies.
  3. Strong working knowledge of Web Hacking.
  4. Effective suspect interviewing skills.
  5. Thorough understanding of documentation.
  6. Sound knowledge of the relevant law.
  7. Practical knowledge of phishing tools, techniques and counter-measures.
  8. Strong knowledge of the working of Virtual Payment Systems.
  9. Understanding of financial instruments and concepts.
  10. Basic understanding of forensic accounting.
  11. Practical knowledge of Fraud Investigation.
  12. Practical knowledge of investigating Bitcoin & other crypto-currencies.
  13. Strong understanding of malware incident prevention & incident response
  14. Thorough practical knowledge of the Dark Web.
  15. Strong practical knowledge of email investigation.
  16. Thorough practical knowledge of Server Log analysis.
  17. Strong practical knowledge of browser forensics
  18. Thorough understanding of Social Media Forensics.
  19. Thorough understanding of the Google Ecosystem & its Forensics.
  20. Strong working knowledge of forensic technologies.
  21. Understanding of the ISO/IEC 27037 standard.
  22. Basic working knowledge of cyber security.
  23. Working knowledge Cryptography & Steganography.
  24. Strong practical knowledge of password recovery & forensics.
  25. Updated knowledge of the latest cyber attacks around the world.

As per Ministry of Human Resources Development estimates - India needs 2.5 lakh cyber experts and professionals to effectively tackle cyber crimes. (Source: Times of India Feb 10, 2011).

Course History

This course was launched in February 2002. In the last 13 years it has been completed by 1000s of participants including:

  • Police Officers,
  • Lawyers & law students,
  • IT professionals & Engineering students,
  • Chartered accountants & CA students,
  • Company Secretaries & CS students,
  • Tax & other Government officials,
  • Military personnel,
  • Management Professionals,
  • Commerce Graduates and students.

The ASCL Certified Cyber Crime Investigator + course was launched in February 2002. In the last 13 years it has been completed by 1000s of participants.

Course Syllabus

This course has 24 modules:

  1. Cyber Crime - Global Scenario
  2. Web Technologies
  3. Web Programming
  4. Web Hacking & Investigation
  5. Suspect Interviewing
  6. Documentation & Legal Issues
  7. Phishing
  8. Virtual Payment Systems
  9. Investigating Financial Crimes
  10. Forensic Accounting
  11. Fraud Investigation
  12. Bitcoin Forensics
  13. Malware
  14. Dark Web
  15. Email Investigation
  16. Investigating Server Logs
  17. Browser Forensics
  18. Social media forensics
  19. Google ecosystem & forensics
  20. Forensic Technologies
  21. Cyber Security Fundamentals
  22. Cryptography & Steganography
  23. Password Forensics
  24. Real World Case Studies

 

India's most popular cyber law course completes 11 years and 20,000 students

India's first and most popular Diploma in Cyber Law course has completed 11 years.

The course was launched in 2004 and has been completed by more than 20,000 participants including

  • Judges,
  • Police Officers,
  • Lawyers & law students,
  • IT professionals & Engineering students,
  • Chartered accountants & CA students,
  • Company Secretaries & CS students,
  • Tax & other Government officials,
  • Military personnel,
  • Management Professionals,
  • Commerce Graduates and
  • Students.

This course is conducted by Asian School of Cyber Laws jointly with The Government Law College, Mumbai (GLC). Founded in 1855, GLC is the oldest law school in Asia dating even prior to the University of Mumbai.

The course is conducted in:

  • distance mode (next batch begin January 2016) and
  • classroom mode (next batch begins July 2016).

With a very low fee (Rs 4,500 for distance mode), the course offers tremendous value for money.

Course Syllabus:

  1. Fundamentals of Cyber Law
  2. E-commerce-Legal issues
  3. Intellectual Property Issues & Cyber space - Indian Perspective
  4. Cyber crime and Digital Evidence - Indian Perspective

 

Become an expert in cyber laws with the DCL+ course.

This course was originally launched as Diploma in Information Technology Law in March 2001. In the last 14 years it has been completed by 12,000+ participants.

What is Cyber Law?

The term cyber or cyberspace has today come to signify everything related to computers, the Internet, websites, data, emails, networks, software, data storage devices and even Airplanes, ATM machines, Baby monitors, Biometric devices, Bitcoin wallets, Cars, CCTV cameras,, Drones, Gaming consoles, Health trackers, Medical devices, Power plants, Self aiming rifles, Smart-watches, Smartphones, Tablets, Wifi networks….

Cyber law is the “law governing cyber space”. The issues addressed by cyber law include:

  • Cyber crime
  • Electronic commerce
  • Intellectual Property in as much as it applies to cyberspace
  • Data protection & privacy

Cyber Law in India

The cyber law ecosystem in India consists of the:

  • Information Technology Act, 2000 (as amended from time to time),
  • allied Acts, Orders, Guidelines, Regulations and Rules,
  • Orders of the Adjudicating Officers and Cyber Appellate Tribunal,
  • Judgements of the courts.

Diploma in Cyber Law +

This is an advanced level course in the Indian Cyber Law and covers:

  • Basic Concepts of Cyber Law,
  • Law of Cyber Crime & Digital Evidence,
  • Intellectual Property in the digital world and
  • Data Privacy Law & IT Act Audit & Compliance.

Course History

This course was launched as Diploma in Information Technology Law in March 2001. In the last 14 years it has been completed by 12,000+ participants including:

  1. Judges,
  2. Police Officers,
  3. Lawyers & law students,
  4. IT professionals & Engineering students,
  5. Chartered accountants & CA students,
  6. Company Secretaries & CS students,
  7. Tax & other Government officials,
  8. Military personnel,
  9. Management Professionals,
  10. Commerce Graduates and students.

Course Syllabus

This course has 6 modules:

  1. Fundamentals of Cyber Law
  2. E-commerce-Legal issues
  3. Intellectual Property Issues & Cyber space - Indian Perspective
  4. Cyber crime and Digital Evidence (Indian Perspective) - 1
  5. Cyber crime and Digital Evidence (Indian Perspective) - 2
  6. Data Privacy Law

 

Need help?

ASCL Certified Cyber Crime Control Consultant

Become an expert in Cyber Crime Control with the c5 course

Who's getting hacked?

Airports, Aerospace companies, Banks, eCommerce, Entertainment companies, Governments, Hacking service providers, Hospitals, IT companies, Insurance companies, Military agencies, Municipalities, Nuclear power plants, Oil companies, Police departments, Retailers, Schools, Stock exchanges, Super-secret agencies, Tax departments, Telecom giants, Universities…..

What's getting hacked?

Airplanes, Apps, ATM machines, Baby monitors, Bank accounts, Biometric devices, Bitcoin wallets, Browsers, Cars, CCTV cameras, Dating sites & apps, Drones, Email accounts, Facebook pages, Gaming consoles, Health trackers, Laptops, Medical devices, Power plants, Routers, Self aiming rifles, Share trading accounts, Smart-watches, Smartphones, Tablets, Websites, Wifi networks….

ASCL Certified Cyber Crime Control Consultant (c5)

The last 2 years have seen some of the world's largest institutions fall prey to cyber crime - JP Morgan Chase, Sony, AT&T, eBay, Google, Apple, Dairy Queen International, Domino's Pizza and half of the South Korean population!

The global cost of cyber crime is estimated to be more than $100 billion a year.

The c5 program has been launched by Asian School of Cyber Laws to help you to develop the skills to minimize the cost and impact of cyber crime on your organisation.

The ASCL Continuous Education Program (CEP) is designed to keep your expertise and skills updated. You are required to obtain 120 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) every 3 years to maintain your c5 certification.

The first batch of this program begins 1st January, 2016.

Certification Syllabus

  1. Global impact of cyber crime
  2. Cyber Incident Response
  3. Data Protection
  4. Fraud Control
  5. Information System Contingency Planning
  6. Cyber Security
  7. Counter Terrorism
  8. Data Privacy
  9. Cyber Insurance
  10. Real World Case Studies

 

Build an awesome Cyber career with the CT+ course

Cyber Crime costs the world more than Rs. 57,000,000,000,000 every year. Companies and Governments need skilled personnel to contain this US $ 114 billion annual cost.

The ASCL Cyber Career Track (CT+) will lay the foundation for your career in Information Security, Incident Response and Fraud Control. CT+ also prepares you to work as a Forensic Technologies Professional in a company specializing in cyber security & cyber forensic services.

Course Programs

The ASCL Cyber Career Track comprises 7 programs:

1. ASCL Certified Cyber Crime Investigator +
2. ASCL Certified Cyber Forensic Analyst +
3. International Program in Cyber Laws +
4. ASCL Program in Fraud Control +
5. ASCL Program in Cyber Security +
6. The 360-degree-program
7. On-job-training (6 months)